Part 1 Insolv Basics

October 2008
Introduction
This guide has been prepared by Braxton. It defines and explains most insolvency procedures and terms, but should only be regarded as an introduction to a complex subject. If you require advice about insolvency you should either speak to your professional adviser or a licensed insolvency practitioner. The information in this guide is correct at date of publication: August 2008.

Section 1 – What is Insolvency?
Insolvency is legally defined as follows:
A company is insolvent (unable to pay its debts) if it either does not have enough assets to cover its debts (ie value of assets is less than amount of liabilities), or if it is unable to pay its debts as they fall due.
An individual is insolvent if he or she is unable to discharge his or her debts as they fall due.
Once a company or individual has become insolvent, several courses of action are open, sometimes resulting in a return to solvency. These are different for individuals and companies (see Section 2 – What Happens in an Insolvency?).
Once insolvency is recognised, the insolvent company or individual must ensure that there is no further depletion in of assets (or increase in liabilities). In any insolvency procedure, the insolvency practitioner takes control of the all of the assets and ensures that all creditors are treated fairly and equally, in proportion to their claims. In addition, in most company insolvency procedure, the insolvency practitioner must report to the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) about the conduct of directors.
An insolvent company goes into administration, administrative receivership or liquidation, whereas an individual becomes bankrupt. Companies are never described in law as bankrupt. Insolvent individuals and companies alike can enter voluntary arrangements.
Insolvency procedures and terminology are similar in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, but differ in Scotland.
Surveys conducted by R3 have consistently shown that many insolvencies could be avoided if professional advice had been sought earlier. The longer a company waits before seeking help, the more likely it becomes that the company or its business will not be rescued.
Likewise, the longer an individual waits before seeking advice, the greater that individual’s debts are likely to be.
There are a number of reasons why a company might become insolvent. R3’s research shows that the most common reasons for corporate insolvency are:
• loss of market: where companies have not recognised the need to change in a shrinking or changing marketplace, because their margins have been eroded or because their service has been overtaken technically
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• management failure to acquire adequate skills, either through training or buying them in, over-optimism in planning, imprudent accounting, lack of management information
• fraud
• loss of long term finance, over-gearing, lack of working capital/cashflow
• other reasons include excessive overheads, new venture/expansion/acquisition.
Company directors’ responsibilities are increasingly emphasised, largely because of the huge numbers of corporate failures during the early 1990s. One of those responsibilities is to ensure that the finances of a company are properly handled and understood.
The DTI’s Disqualification Unit is becoming increasingly active. If directors knowingly cause a company to trade when it is insolvent and when there is no real prospect of improvement in its finances, they are increasingly liable to disqualification. In fact, new ‘fast track’ laws to disqualify directors of insolvent companies whose conduct makes them unfit for management were introduced in April 2001.
Sometimes, all that is needed is a third party to point out how a company can improve its financial condition. There may be serious underlying problems, but it is always worth speaking to a licensed insolvency practitioner or other member of R3. They will usually not charge for a first consultation. R3 is very happy to provide details of licensed insolvency practitioners and members of R3 in any area of the UK.
For individuals, the choice of procedures is more limited (see Section 2 – What Happens in an Insolvency? and Section 6 – Personal Insolvency). As with companies, the sooner a problem is identified and addressed, the sooner it can be rectified and the best outcome achieved.
Naturally, the causes of insolvency for individuals are often different from those for companies. Although many personal insolvencies involve sole traders or self-employed people, insolvencies for purely ‘domestic’ reasons have featured heavily in R3’s research over the last few years, especially with easily available credit and personal finance.
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Section 2 – What Happens in an Insolvency?
The objective of any insolvency procedure is to maximise returns to creditors. The mechanism used to achieve that goal will depend on circumstances and the availability of assets, but in many cases a licensed insolvency practitioner will attempt to rescue the business if this will provide a better return for the creditors.
Once a company or individual is recognised as being insolvent, or thinks it may become insolvent, there are a number of alternatives available to the insolvent party (the debtor) or its creditors. The options have varying degrees of formality, from less restrictive voluntary arrangements for both individuals and companies, to more structured and restrictive procedures such as liquidation, administration and administrative receivership for companies and bankruptcy for individuals.
England, Wales and Northern Ireland
The process of corporate insolvency may be initiated by one of several parties.
• The directors and/or shareholders themselves are able to initiate several forms of insolvency process if they believe the company is (or is about to become) insolvent. They may appoint an administrator or apply for an administration order, or they may liquidate a company by means of a creditors’ voluntary liquidation (CVL). Alternatively, they may advise a charge holder (usually a bank) of the situation who may then appoint an administrator or an administrative receiver (but it is generally not possible to appoint an administrative receiver where the charge has been created after 15 September 2003).
• Creditors may apply for the company to be liquidated via the courts, a compulsory liquidation.
• A debenture holder – if a bank, or other creditor, holds a charge or mortgage over the assets of a company, it may appoint an administrator or an administrative receiver if it feels that repayment of a loan or its security is threatened and if the borrower has breached the loan covenants (again, an administrative receiver cannot generally be appointed where the charge was created after 15 September 2003).
• The Secretary of State for Trade and Industry may petition the court for the winding up (compulsory liquidation) of a company if he believes it is acting against the public interest.
• As far as individuals are concerned, either the debtor or one of his creditors can begin the insolvency process by presenting a petition for bankruptcy to the court.
• Alternatively, with the assistance of a licensed insolvency practitioner, the debtor may prepare a proposal for an individual voluntary arrangement (IVA).
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Scotland
The effect of an insolvency procedure in Scotland is the same as in the rest of the UK, unless expressly stated otherwise. However, Scotland has a quite separate system of property law, and therefore also a different set of legislation dealing with the insolvency procedures. Accordingly, it cannot be assumed that because something happens a certain way in England and Wales or Northern Ireland it will be the same in Scotland.
In Scotland the corporate insolvency processes are much the same as in England and Wales, but the procedures differ slightly. This will be considered further in Section 5 – Corporate Insovency.
Individuals and partnerships in Scotland are sequestrated. This is the equivalent of bankruptcy. The Trust Deed replaces the IVA. This is considered further at Section 6 – Personal Insolvency.
Insolvency Procedure
More details of what is involved in each insolvency procedure are given in Section 5 – Corporate Insolvency and in Section 6 – Personal Insolvency.
In an insolvency procedure, control of the assets of the debtor business, or individual, rests with the licensed insolvency practitioner, except in voluntary arrangements where control of the assets will often remain with the company or the debtor. The licensed insolvency practitioner may in some cases also exercise extensive control over the running of a business.
Once the assets of the individual or company are realised, or as they become available from income streams, they are distributed in a strict order of priority:
• Any individual or organisation holding fixed charge security over a company’s assets is paid first, after the costs of realisation.
• The next group of creditors to receive funds, if there are any remaining, are preferential creditors, which consist mainly of employees’ arrears of wages and holiday pay to specified limits.
• Third in line are holders of floating charge securities (except for a proportion which may need to be set aside for unsecured creditors).
• Fourth are unsecured creditors (eg trade creditors) to the extent that they are not discharged as above. In insolvency cases this may result in a percentage return by way of dividend or possibly no return at all for this class of creditor, depending on the realisations and classes of creditor making a claim in the proceedings.
• Last the queue are the shareholders, or in the case of a bankrupt, himself or herself.
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Section 3 – The Business of Rescue
The task presented to R3’s members is always to extract from a company the greatest value for the benefit of its creditors.
Usually, the greatest returns to creditors are achieved by maintaining a business as a going concern. Surveys have shown that creditors of all classes generally get much better returns from rescues and reconstructions than they do from liquidations. The most widely used mechanism for achieving business rescue is the administration procedure, the use of which has been encouraged by recent legislative reforms. Company voluntary arrangements (CVAs) have also seen reforms making them more useable rescue vehicles.
However, the majority of corporate insolvency cases are liquidations in which there may be little to rescue and the licensed insolvency practitioner is likely to be left with little alternative but to sell off the company’s assets on a break-up basis.
This may be necessary because, for example, the business is beyond rescue, the prime assets may be the employees who have left (in service companies for example), the company could simply be a shell company, or because creditors will not approve a voluntary arrangement.
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Section 4 – The Insolvency Practitioner
Only licensed insolvency practitioners are authorised to take insolvency appointments in England, Wales and Northern Ireland as Administrators, Administrative Receivers, Liquidators, Trustees in Bankruptcy, Nominees and Supervisors of Voluntary Arrangements, and Trustees under Deeds of Arrangement, and in Scotland as Scottish Receivers, Liquidators, Administrators, Trustees in Sequestration and Trustees under Protected Trust Deeds.
All these terms are defined and explained in the glossary and in the section on each specific procedure.
Licensed insolvency practitioners are uniquely well qualified to advise people and businesses in financial difficulties. It is always advisable to ensure that advice is sought from people who are properly qualified.
All practising insolvency practitioners in the United Kingdom must be licensed by one of the bodies listed in Section 9, and only these licensed insolvency practitioners are permitted to take insolvency appointments. The process of becoming a licensed insolvency practitioner is arduous. Most licensed insolvency practitioners have qualified as accountants or lawyers and have been practising for several years before being able to qualify.
As investigating accountants to troubled businesses, licensed insolvency practitioners are required to give objective advice on financial viability, usually by or at the behest of a concerned lender or other creditor, or in advance of increased lending requirements. This generally requires a subjective appraisal of the skill and integrity of the managers of the business as well as of the prevailing commercial environment. It is a skill that licensed insolvency practitioners are uniquely qualified to provide.
Licensed insolvency practitioners will seek to make positive recommendations which will assist the enterprise to avoid insolvency and to prosper. Many businesses do survive given such intensive care, provided that help is sought early enough.
The unique skills and experience that R3 members are able to draw on means that they are frequently involved in reorganisations and work-outs outside formal insolvency, which will also depend on the cooperation and support of the lenders.
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Section 5 – Corporate Insolvency
England, Wales and Northern Ireland
There are five categories of insolvency procedure for companies in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. These are:
• Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA)
• Administration
• Administrative Receivership
• Creditors’ Voluntary Liquidation (CVL)
• Compulsory Liquidation (winding up by the court)
Receivers may also be appointed under fixed charges (fixed charge receiverships) on specific assets owned by a company. These are not technically insolvency appointments as such appointments may be made irrespective of the solvency of the company. There is also members’ voluntary liquidation (MVL), but this only applies to solvent companies and is instituted by the shareholders. Companies involved in this procedure are, by definition, able to pay all their creditors, and are often wound up simply because they have outlived their usefulness.
Insolvent partnerships in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are subject to compulsory liquidation, not CVLs, but the partners, because of the relationship between them and the partnership may individually be made bankrupt or enter individual voluntary arrangements (see Section 6 – Personal Insolvency).
In addition, a partnership may enter a modified CVA or an administration.
Of the above procedures, the first three may be used as vehicles for business rescue, whereas liquidation is a terminal process for the company and usually marks the end of the business activities as well. Each procedure is explained in further detail on the following pages. Fixed charge receiverships and Members’ Voluntary Liquidations are explained under ‘Other Procedures’ at the end of this section, together with details of a further procedure, the scheme of arrangement.
Scotland
The following insolvency procedures operate for Scottish companies:
• Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA)
• Administration
• Receivership (Scotland)
• Creditors’ Voluntary Liquidation (CVL)
• Compulsory Liquidation
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A Scottish partnership is sequestrated, and will therefore be dealt with under the personal insolvency section in Section 6 – Personal Insolvency.
Rescue Procedures
When a company reaches the stage where formal insolvency procedures must be instituted, the primary objective for the licensed insolvency practitioner is to realise the greatest return for the company’s creditors. Depending on the stage at which the company realises it is in trouble, the best return is almost always most successfully achieved by keeping the company’s business operating. This enables two possibilities: either the business can continue to operate and generate cash for the creditors, or it can be sold on as a going concern. Companies with businesses that can be sold on as going concerns almost always have a much higher realisable value than the liquidated assets of the company or its businesses, and therefore provide greater returns for the creditors. Often however a company is hopelessly insolvent and beyond saving. In such cases, liquidation is the only option, and this is discussed further below.
A number of procedures are available to enable the continuation of a company’s business or businesses:
• Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA)
• Administration
• Administrative Receivership
• Receivership (Scotland)
Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA)
A company voluntary arrangement is a procedure which enables a company to put a proposal to its creditors for a composition in satisfaction of its debts or a scheme of arrangement of its affairs. A composition is an agreement under which creditors agree to accept a certain sum of money in settlement of the debts due to them. The procedure is extremely flexible and the form which the voluntary arrangement takes will depend on the terms of the proposal agreed by the creditors. For example, a CVA may involve delayed or reduced payments of debt, capital restructuring or an orderly disposal of assets.
The proposed arrangement requires the approval of at least 75% in value of the creditors, and once approved is legally binding on the company and all its creditors, whether or not they voted in favour of it. There is limited involvement by the court, and the scheme is under the control of a licensed insolvency practitioner acting as a supervisor.
The CVA procedure was introduced by the Insolvency Act 1986 and was designed primarily as a mechanism for business rescue. The procedure is also often used instead of liquidation as a means of distributing funds on the conclusion of (and, occasionally, during) an administration.
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A modified CVA may also be applied to insolvent partnerships.
PROCEDURE FOR CVA
1. Proposal
May be made by directors, administrator or liquidator.
2. Nominee
Insolvency practitioner nominated under terms of proposal to supervise its implementation. Where the company is in administration or liquidation, the administrator or liquidator may act as nominee.
3. Where nominee is not administrator or liquidator
Nominee notifies the court whether, in his opinion, a meeting of
creditors should be held in order to consider the proposal.
4. Where nominee is administrator or liquidator
Nominee proceeds directly to convene creditors’ meeting.
5. Creditors’ meeting
Usually held within eight weeks of the notice of proposal to nominee. May approve, modify or reject proposal and may choose another nominee. Requires a majority of 75 % in value of the creditors present and voting. The proposal may not affect the rights of secured or preferential creditors without their assent.
6. Supervisor
If the proposal is approved, the nominee becomes the supervisor and implements the arrangement in accordance with the terms of the proposal.
Administration
Administration is a procedure available to a company that is insolvent, or is likely to become so, which places the company under the control of an insolvency practitioner and the protection of the court with the following objectives:
• rescuing the company as a going concern
• achieving a better result for the creditors as a whole than would be likely if the company were wound up without first being in administration
or, if the administrator thinks neither of these objectives is reasonably practicable
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• realising property in order to make a distribution to secured or preferential creditors.
While a company is in administration creditors are prevented from taking any actions against it except with the permission of the court.
Reforms were introduced by the Enterprise Act 2002 to encourage the use of administration as the preferred vehicle for company and business rescue within formal insolvency.
An administrator may be appointed:
• by an order of the court, on application by the company, its directors, one or more creditors, or, if it is in liquidation, its liquidator
• without a court order, by direct appointment by the company, its directors or a creditor who holds comprehensive security of a type which qualifies him to make such an appointment.
A secured creditor who is qualified to make an appointment may also intervene where the company has made an application to the court. This means that the secured creditor’s choice of administrator will prevail.
An administrator’s powers are very broad. They include powers to carry on the company’s business and realise its assets. The administrator displaces the company’s board of directors from its management function and has the power to remove or appoint directors. The administrator must prepare proposals for approval by the creditors setting out how he intends to achieve the purpose of administration.
There is a one year time limit within which the administration must be concluded, but this period can be extended with the agreement of the creditors or the permission of the court if more time is needed to achieve the purpose of administration. The administration may also come to an end if the administrator thinks the purpose of administration has been achieved or cannot be achieved.
On conclusion of an administration:
• the company may be returned to the control of its directors and management
• the company may go into liquidation
• the company may be dissolved (if there are no funds for distribution to unsecured creditors)
• if a voluntary arrangement has been agreed during the administration, the arrangement may continue according to its terms. (It is possible for a voluntary arrangement to run concurrently with an administration).
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PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATION
A. Appointment by court order
1. Company is, or likely to become, unable to pay its debts
2. Application to the court
Presented by company, directors, creditors or liquidator, with supporting statement by proposed administrator that the purpose of administration is reasonably likely to be achieved. Notice given to charge holder qualified to appoint an administrator, who thereby has an opportunity to apply to the court for the appointment of an alternative administrator.
3. Administration Order
Administrator appointed. Winding-up petition (if any) dismissed.
B. Appointment by company or directors without court order
1. Company is, or is likely to become, unable to pay its debts
2. Notice of intention to appoint
Notice filed at court. Notice (five days) given to charge holder qualified to appoint an administrator, who thereby has an opportunity to appoint an administrator of his choice.
3. Appointment
Notice of appointment filed at court, together with statement by administrator that the purpose of administration is reasonably likely to be achieved.
C. Appointment by secured creditor without court order
1. Security must be enforceable
2. Notice of intention to appoint
Notice (two days) given to holder of any prior floating charge. Copy of notice may also be filed at court to obtain interim protection.
3. Appointment
Notice of appointment filed at court, together with statement by administrator that the purpose of administration is reasonably likely to be achieved. Winding-up petition (if any) suspended.
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D. Following appointment
4. Consequences of appointment
No administrative receiver can be appointed. Security over assets cannot
be enforced without consent of the secured creditor. Administrator can sell property subject to hire-purchase, mortgage, and retention of title, with court’s permission.
5D . uties of Adminis rator t
Manages the business. Proposal for future conduct. Calls meeting of
creditors.
6. Creditors’ Meeting
Held within 10 weeks of company entering administration. Proposal
approved, modified or rejected. Majority in value of those voting required to
approve proposal. In some circumstances a meeting is not necessary.
7. Implementation
Administrator reports back to court. Proposal implemented.
dministrative Receivership (England, Wales and Northern Ireland)
le, or
he charge is contained in a document known as a debenture, which will
a
en
he administrative receiver has similar powers to the administrator described
o
sis.
should be noted that an administrative receiver has no authority to deal with the
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dministrative receivers are normally appointed by a bank or other lending
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institution which has as security for a loan (under a floating charge) the whosubstantially the whole, of a company’s property. This is often abbreviated simply to receivership. The ability to appoint normally arises when the company is in default or in breach of the terms of its borrowing.
T
frequently also include fixed charges and the lender is often referred to asdebenture holder. This does not have to be just one bank; it could be, and oftis, a consortium of banks or other lenders.
T
above. He can continue to operate the business, and often does, whilst trying tsell it as a
going concern. If he manages to do this he will usually achieve a
higher price than if the company’s assets were disposed of on a break-up baThe money realised by the receiver is distributed to the creditors in the manner described in Section 2 – What Happens in an Insolvency, above.
It
claims of unsecured creditors (eg trade creditors). If sufficient funds become available for distribution to the general body of creditors they must be dealt with by a separately appointed liquidator.
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It is longer possible to appoint an administrative receiver under a security instrument created after 15 September 2003. Instead, creditors with floating charge security can appoint an administrator (see above).
PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE RECEIVERSHIP
1. Only available to a lender with a floating charge security (usually a bank)
2. When to Appoint
When the borrower is in default or in breach of terms of the security
document. Usually follows a demand for repayment, frequently at request
of directors (although only the lender can actually appoint a receiver).
3. Appointment
Made by the secured lender. A receiver may be appointed with maximum speed and minimum formality. The appointor notifies Companies House, the receiver notifies the company and creditors. The receiver also advertises the appointment in the London Gazette and an appropriate newspaper.
4. Powers and Capacity of Receiver
Depend on the security document, but will normally enable the receiver to
carry on a company’s business and realise its assets. The receiver acts as
the agent of the company unless and until it goes into liquidation.
5. Information to Creditors
Within three months of appointment, the receiver must send a report to the creditors and convene a creditors’ meeting to receive the report (unless a liquidator has been appointed in the meantime, in which case the report goes only to the liquidator). The meeting may also appoint a creditors’ committee.
6. Conclusion of Receivership
The receiver ceases to act when he has realised the security or repaid his appointor and notifies Companies House accordingly.
Receivership (Scotland)
Whereas the process has only a slightly different name in England and Wales (administrative receivership as opposed to receivership in Scotland), there are a number of important differences in procedure and terminology between the two. The appointment of a receiver is at the instance of a bank or other lending institution which has as security for a loan (under a floating charge) the whole or
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substantially the whole of the company’s property. A receiver’s appointment may also be by the court on application from the holder.
It is not possible for the holder of what is termed a Standard Security (a fixed charge over a heritable property) to appoint a receiver, unless they also hold a floating charge. A floating charge can be granted over any of the assets of a company, not just the heritable assets. The property owned by the debtor at the time the receiver is appointed determines what is subject to the floating charge.
The instrument creating the floating charge will usually specify the events which give rise to the right to appoint. If not specified in the charge document, the following circumstances also enable appointment to be made:
• the expiry of a period of 21 days or as defined within the floating charge, failing which after the making of a demand for payment of the whole or any part of the principal sum secured by the charge, without payment having been made
• the expiry of a period of two months during the whole of which interest due and payable under that charge has been in arrears
• the making of an order or the passing of a resolution to wind up the company
• the appointment of a receiver by virtue of any other floating charge created by the company.
The Scottish receiver has similar powers to the administrative receiver described above. Generally, his powers are as wide as those given to the board of directors, enabling him to carry on the company’s business, to raise money using the company’s assets as security and to sell those assets covered by the charge.
As in the case of an administrative receiver, a Scottish receiver will often continue to operate the business as a going concern in order to achieve the best outcome.
It is no longer be possible to appoint a receiver under a security instrument created after 15 September 2003. Instead, creditors with floating charge security can appoint an administrator (see above).
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PROCEDURE FOR RECEIVERSHIP (SCOTLAND)
1. Only available to a lender with a floating charge security (usually a bank)
2. When to Appoint
When the borrower is in default or in breach of terms of the security document. Usually follows a demand for repayment, frequently at request of directors (although only the lender can actually “call in the receivers”).
3. Appointment
Made by the floating charge lender. A receiver may be appointed with maximum speed and minimum formality. The appointor notifies the Registrar of Companies, the receiver notifies the company and creditors. The receiver also advertises the appointment in the Edinburgh Gazette (if a Scottish registered company) and an appropriate newspaper.
4. Powers and Capacity of Receive
Depend on the security document, but will normally enable the receiver to carry on a company’s business and realise its assets. The receiver acts as the agent of the company.
5. Information to Creditors
Within three months of appointment, the receiver must send a report to the creditors and convene a creditors’ meeting to receive the report (unless a liquidator has been appointed in the meantime, in which case the report goes only to the liquidator). The meeting may also appoint a creditors’ committee.
6. Conclusion of Receivership
The receiver ceases to act when he has realised the security or repaid his appointor and notifies the Registrar of Companies accordingly.
Liquidations
Regrettably, it is often not possible to sell a business, perhaps because in a ‘people business’ everyone has left or because that type of business is not seen as viable under current economic conditions. It is also often the case that the directors of a company do not seek help in sufficient time to allow the company to be saved, and by the time they do so it is hopelessly insolvent. Any of these reasons can lead to a company being placed into liquidation and its assets sold off. The proceeds of the sale are then distributed to the creditors, in a defined order of priority. Liquidation is, with very few exceptions, the end of the road for a company and it will then be removed from the companies register.
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A liquidation may be solvent or insolvent. A solvent liquidation is known as a members’ voluntary liquidation (MVL), in which the liquidator is appointed by the shareholders and the company’s assets are sufficient to settle all its liabilities, including statutory interest, within twelve months. An insolvent liquidation will be either a creditors’ voluntary liquidation (CVL), which is begun by resolution of the shareholders, or a compulsory liquidation, which is instituted by petition to the court.
Liquidation may occur in a number of ways. It may occur following a receivership or administration. The company’s directors or shareholders may recommend that the company be put directly into liquidation via either a CVL or MVL. Alternatively, a court can make a winding-up order for a compulsory liquidation on the application of a creditor or of the company itself. The company itself is simply a legal entity, and may not be sold with the business, which will frequently be transferred to another company. Therefore, if the company’s business has been sold on the company will be liquidated and the creditors will be given their share from the proceeds of the sale.
In an MVL the liquidator is appointed by shareholders. In a CVL the appointment is made by the shareholders subject to confirmation or replacement at the creditors’ meeting by the creditors, and in a compulsory liquidation the creditors nominate the liquidator. MVLs are explained at the end of this section, under ‘Other Procedures’.
Compulsory Liquidation (England, Wales and Northern Ireland)
A compulsory liquidation (or compulsory winding up) is a liquidation which is ordered by the court, usually on the petition of a creditor, the company or a shareholder.
There are a number of possible reasons for making a winding-up order. The most common is because the company is insolvent.
Insolvency can be established by failure to comply with a statutory demand requiring payment within 21 days, or by an execution against the company’s goods which remains unsatisfied.
A winding-up petition may also be presented by the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry on the grounds of public interest.
The company to be liquidated is first referred by the court to the official receiver, who is a civil servant and an officer of the court, and usually becomes liquidator on the making of the winding-up order. If the assets are likely to cover the administrative costs, the official receiver will usually call a creditors’ meeting to appoint a liquidator, otherwise he will remain in office. In some cases, the official receiver may, using powers delegated to him by the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, appoint a professional liquidator direct. The official receiver retains responsibility for investigating the conduct of directors and other officers as well as any other investigation work required.

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